Flu Vaccinations

Flu and Other Vaccinations

FLU VACCINATIONS

THIS YEAR THERE ARE 3 DIFFERENT FLU VACCINATIONS. PATIENTS NEED TO BE GIVEN THE CORRECT VACCINE FOR THEIR AGE GROUP

VACCINE DELIVERIES ARE TAKING PLACE FROM SEPTEMBER – NOVEMBER 2018. WE ARE HOLDING A NUMBER OF FLU CLINICS DURING THESE MONTHS.

LATEST WEEKDAY CLINICS 2.00pm – 3.00pm

07.11.18 & 14.11.18

LATEST SATURDAY CLINIC 8.30am – 1.00pm

03.11.18

PATIENTS WILL NEED TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT. WE CAN THEN MAKE SURE WE HAVE ENOUGH SUPPLIES OF THE RIGHT VACCINES.

PATIENTS WHO ATTENDED OUR FIRST CLINIC ON 08.09.18 REALLY LIKED HAVING AN APPOINTMENT. IT SAVED AN QUEUING AND EVERYONE WAS SEEN VERY QUICKLY.

Influenza or ‘flu’ is a respiratory illness associated with infection by influenza virus. Symptoms frequently include headache, fever, cough, sore throat, aching muscles and joints.
For most people influenza infection is just a nasty experience, but for some it can lead to more serious illnesses. The most common complications of influenza are bronchitis and secondary bacterial pneumonia. These illnesses may require treatment in hospital and can be life threatening especially in the elderly, asthmatics and those in poor health.

Flu vaccinations are only available between September and March each year.

Influenza immunisation is recommended for patients with any of the following:

  • Age 65 and over (including patients becoming aged 65 years by 31.3.2018)
  • Respiratory problems (including Asthma and COPD)
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease
  • Heart problems
  • Diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Neurological Problems, including Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinsons
  • Pregnant women (please see below for further detail)
  • Problems with your spleen (including Coeliac Disease)
  • Weakened immune system
  • Long-term use of steroids or having Chemotherapy
  • Living in residential or nursing homes
  • Main carer for an elderly or disabled person
  • Those directly involved in delivering healthcare (where they and vulnerable patients are at increased risk of exposure to seasonal flu)
  • Body Mass Index of 40kg/m2 and above (classified as morbidly obese)

Flu vaccine is also recommended for:

  • children over the age of 6 months with a long-term health condition
  • children aged 2 and 3 years (born between 01.09.2013 – 31.08.2015).

Children aged between 2 and 17 will usually have the a nasal spray vaccine

Pregnant women
If you are pregnant, you are advised to have a flu vaccine, regardless of the stage of pregnancy you’ve reached. There is strong evidence to suggest pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu.
The flu vaccine:

  • reduces your chance of getting serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia, particularly in the later stages of pregnancy
  • reduces your risk of having a miscarriage, or your baby being born prematurely or with a low birth weight because of the flu
  • will help protect your baby as they will continue to have some immunity to flu for the first few months of their life.

PNEUMOCOCCOL VACCINATIONS

Pneumococcal vaccinations are available throughout the year to all eligible patients.

Pneumococcal disease, including septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis particularly affects the very young, the elderly, those with an absent or non-functioning spleen and with impaired immunity.

Pneumococcal vaccinations are available throughout the year.

Pneumococcal immunisation is recommended for patients with any of the following:

  • Age 65 and over
  • Chronic respiratory disease (such as COPD)
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic liver disease
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Problems with your spleen (including Coeliac Disease)
  • Weakened immune system
  • Long-term use of steroids or having Chemotherapy
  • People with cochlear implants
  • People with cerebrospinal fluid leaks
  • Some people with an occupational risk, including those who work with metal fumes, such as welders

Most adults only require one Pneumococcal immunisation in their lifetime.
You can have this injection at the same time as your flu vaccination.

SHINGLES VACCINATION

Shingles vaccinations are available throughout the year to all eligible patients.

Shingles can be very painful and uncomfortable. Some people are left with pain lasting for years after the initial rash has healed. Shingles is fatal for around 1 in 1,000 over-70s who develop it.
A vaccine to prevent shingles, a common, painful skin disease is now available.
The vaccine is expected to reduce your risk of getting shingles. If you are unlucky enough to go on to have the disease, your symptoms may be milder and the illness shorter.

Patients are eligible for the shingles vaccine if they are aged 70 or 78 years old.
Anyone who was eligible for immunisation previously remains eligible for the vaccination until their 80th birthday. This includes people in their 70s who were born after 1 September 1942 and people aged 79 years.

You only need to have this vaccination once.
You can have a shingles vaccination at the same time as having a flu or Pneumonia vaccination.

The shingles vaccine is not available on the NHS to anyone aged 80 and over because it seems to be less effective in this age group.

You can have the shingles vaccination at any time of year, though many find it convenient to have it at the same time as their flu vaccination.